Smitten Kitten

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Our generation responds to the tragic bittersweet ending, the teenage feeling that suggests that the best of life is concentrated into its most fleeting moments. Embedded within it is an admirable desire for innocence, to turn back the clock to what we were before we became jaded, world-weary and old. I expect the newest Spider-Man film to fashion its drama entirely around such nostalgia. But we can’t stay young forever, and when we try, the stories of our lives will ultimately ring as hollow as Peter Parker’s has become, and all we are left with is reliving our youth in our entertainment as well as in life.

There is a time and a place for youthfulness, but it is just a prologue to adulthood. The lessons we learn contribute to the people we become, and there comes a time to move on and explore new ways of life, meaningful relationships and a settled spirit. It is time for our entertainment to grow up, to show us more than the beautiful aimlessness of youth. How does innocence become righteousness, relationship become marriage and power become responsibility?

That’s the sequel I’ll be looking forward to.

Alex Wilgus, When Will Spider-Man Grow Up? 

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  1. la-viee-en-rose reblogged this from denisecua
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  7. captainbackfire said: he actually does grow up in the comic but they revamped the story later on :(
  8. denisecua posted this